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EIKON # 98


EIKON # 98

Artists | Camille Henrot | Matthias Klos | Brigitte Kowanz | Katharina Stiglitz | James Welling | Erwin Wurm |

Carl Aigner | Gregor Auenhammer | Thomas Ballhausen | Simon Bowcock | Nela Eggenberger | Robert Gander | Tania Hölzl | Georgia Holz | Ruth Horak | Suzuan Kizilirmak | Peter Kunitzky | Katharina Manojlovic | Petra Noll-Hammerstiel | Günther Oberhollenzer | Maria Rennhofer | Veronika Rudorfer | Roland Schöny | Walter Seidl | Denise Helene Sumi | Thomas D. Trummer | Axel Wieder

Languages | German / English
Dimensions | 280 x 210 mm
ISBN | 978-3-902250-90-2
92 pages

Price: € 15,00 (incl. 10% VAT)

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Content

PORTFOLIO

CAMILLE HENROT | Roland Schöny
KATHARINA STIGLITZ | Veronika Rudorfer
JAMES WELLING | Ruth Horak
MATTHIAS KLOS | Georgia Holz

LA BIENNALE DI VENEZIA

BRIGITTE KOWANZ | Maria Rennhofer
ERWIN WURM | Carl Aigner

PROJECTS

ROMAN SIGNER. Water Sculpture

WERKPORTRAIT

JULIA ROHN. Straw Study (3)

ARTS & STUDIES

MARA NOVAK

IM FOKUS

SCATTERED WORLD(s)
The Photographic Collage in Works of Contemporary Art | Günther Oberhollenzer

FORUM

 Imn Coversation: Edward Burtynsky | Walter Seidl

Ausstellungen

Two Sophisticated Austrians in Self-Portraits. Sabine Groschup, Paul Albert Leitner | Robert Gander
Strange and Familiar. Britain as Revealed by International Photographers | Simon Bowcock
Marina Abramovic. The Cleaner | Axel Wieder
Allan Sekula. Okeanos | Denise Helene Sumi
Gabriele Rothemann. QUIRE. Twenty-four Birdcages | Veronika Rudorfer
Watching You, Watching Me. A Photographic Response of Surveillance | Suzan Kizilirmak
A Feast of Astonishments. Charlotte Moorman and the Avant-Garde | Tania Hölzl

Editorial

In times of digital slickness and immaculate retouching, which have prevailed since the 1990s with the rise of new possibilities of image editing, obvious transitions between two or more image layers are a thing of the past, or at least one that artists don’t have to ponder anymore for lack of alternatives. At present, however, the euphoria of the past decades about the aesthetic of seamless image manipulation and all-too homogeneous photo amalgams seems to have subsided. A hundred years after Hannah Höch, Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield, and other pioneers of Dadaism have discovered the photocollage for themselves, photography has been featuring a striking number of analog picture montages that employ the obvious construction of their composition (in their seemingly makeshift overlays) as an essential stylistic device. While a nostalgic feeling for the analog era may be implicit in the artistic recourse to the collage, it would certainly be short-sighted to limit our diagnosis to this. Much rather, the majority of practitioners seem to use it primarily to point out today’s steadily increasing possibilities of manipulation (in various media).

Reason enough to “focus” our current issue on this multilayered artistic technique. In “Scattered World(s),” Günther Oberhollenzer covers a broad spectrum from conventional analog collage and digital photomontage all the way to assembled photo-sculpture, taking into account mostly contemporary artists from Austria. In this context, it looks as if today, at a time when we “seem to perceive the world in ever-more fragmentary terms despite all the images and information available to us” (p. 64), this one-hundred-year-old technique is able to visualize the mechanisms of our times particularly accurately.

Your EIKON team with
Nela Eggenberger


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