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EIKON # 88


EIKON # 88

Artists | Daniele Buetti | Bernhard Hosa | Mischa Leinkauf | Mathieu Pernot | Elizabeth Price | Matthias Wermke |

Contributors | Montse Badia | Thomas Ballhausen | Brigitte Borchhardt-Birbaumer | Simon Bowcock | Wolfgang Brückle | Margit Emesz | Marie Gimpel | Philipp Goldbach | Matthias Harder | Ruth Horak | Manisha Jothady | Peter Kunitzky | Teresa Lošonc | Katharina Manojlović | Andreas Müller | Nicholas Negroponte | Inge Nevole | Agnes Prammer | Uta M. Reindl | Eva Tropper | Thomas D. Trummer | Claudia Weinzierl | James Welling

Languages | German / English
Dimensions | 280 x 210 mm
ISBN | 978-3-902250-78-0
88 pages

 

Price: € 14,00 (incl. 10% VAT)

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Content

PORTFOLIO

DANIELE BUETTI | Thomas D. Trummer
BERNHARD HOSA | Manisha Jothady
MATHIEU PERNOT | Matthias Harder
ELIZABETH PRICE | Uta M. Reindl
WERMKE/LEINKAUF | Inge Nevole

ARTS & STUDIES

PRETTY RAW

IN FOCUS: AN HOMAGE TO THE ANALOG

THE ANALOG TURN  | Ruth Horak
STATEMENTS  | Agnes Prammer, Marie Gimpel, Philipp Goldbach, Nicholas Negroponte, James Welling

FORUM

"ARTS AND CULTURE MAKE OUR EXPERIENCE OF THE WORLD MORE COMPLEX:" An interview with Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo | Montse Badia

EXHIBITIONS

MANIFESTE! An alternative history of photography | Wolfgang Brückle
K.U.SCH. A palette of themes | Brigitte Borchhardt-Birbaumer
STAGED. Photography as agency in the Habsburg Monarchy | Eva Tropper
CONSTRUCTING WORLDS. Photography and the Architecture in the Modern Age | Simon Bowcock

 

Editorial

“What is photography? Is it the print? Is it an object or a JPEG on your computer screen?” This is written on the back cover of a recently published catalog by Edition Folkwang. If it wasn’t easy to grasp photography as a phenomenon before, it certainly hasn’t gotten easier with (new) digital developments. And if the image generated by pixels was originally introduced to avoid a detour via the scanner, the photograph has come to be intended primarily for the electronic transfer on the screen—and no longer as a haptic print.
Bearing this in mind as well as the increasing loss of knowledge and material, which analog photography invariably has had to (and still has to) put up with as the digital image has become omnipresent, it seems to stand to reason that art photographers are currently seizing upon the roots of their medium, perhaps not least because it will not (yet?) be able to exist as an intangible product in the near future.
Ruth Horak, the curator of the main topic of the current issue, “In Focus: An Homage to the Analog” provides EIKON readers with an overview of the ways in which the analog is represented in contemporary photography. In addition, Horak has invited five artists and scientists to state what they feel is essential about the “archetypal form” of photography. For hardly any of them it implied a nostalgically idealized view of the past, but rather a sober, at times systematic, discussion of analog vocabulary—from mechanical equipment and the various chemicals the process requires to the individual, almost meditative steps implemented or carried out in the darkroom (the place where “the indexed relationship between world and image is still intact,” cf. Horak, p. 53).
George Eastman’s often-quoted slogan, “You Press the Button, We Do the Rest,” has helped photography to achieve a commercial breakthrough. At the end of the analog era, it is now the artists who make this “rest” (consisting of a highly complex process) visible and hopefully—in accordance with the basic idea of a non-ephemeral image—preserve it for posterity.

Nela Eggenberger
and the EIKON team

 

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